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The Penn Foster Blog

Where Talent Meets Career Opportunity

Your hourly employees are the face of your quick-serve restaurant- responsible for the day-to-day interactions between your customers and your business. These positions are often plagued with high turnover rates and unfortunately, sometimes the people filling them fail to deliver the quality of service your brand promises. Training and skills development are excellent tools, but they should be thought of as tactics to enhance already-existing characteristics, ones that can't always be be taught. When hiring hourly employees for your restaurant, ensure they fit front-line job requirements by looking for these characteristics:
It probably comes as no surprise that confident employees tend to take more initiative at work and perform better at their jobs overall. Numerous experts confirm this; for example, Chron reports that employees who have confidence in their ability to get the job done are more engaged and motivated1 This is especially important in for QSRs, with an average industry turnover rate of 66% making it critical that managers improve employee engagement and, in turn, retention. Implement these simple tactics to improve confidence in your employees and reap the rewards of more productive and loyal workers.
A partnership is built by different parties having different traits and coming together to achieve success. We've found that our partnership with Penn Foster is building upon that success. On June 3, 2016 I had the privilege to co-present with Penn Foster at the Ohio Association of Career Colleges and Schools (OACCS) 2016 Spring Workshop on how our partnership has helped our college reach into an untapped pool of potential students, and provide students a second chance to pursue post-secondary education. In Ohio, as in a growing number of other states, students must pass a state regulated exit exam as a final hurdle to obtain their high school diploma. Unfortunately in the Cleveland, OH area there are too many students who have failed that exam and essentially have no other option to pursue education. There is no reason for them to give up on their education any longer.
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Seven percent of American youth between the ages of 16 and 24 were not in school and had not earned a high school diploma or the equivalent as of 2013, according to the latest data available from the National Center for Education Statistics.1 To assist these young people, many school districts are offering high school reentry programs. Dr. Julia Wilkins, who specializes in helping youth with disabilities complete high school, studied the characteristics of a successful high school reentry program and summarized them in a report titled, "Reentry Programs for Out-of-School Youth With Disabilities."2 Here are five elements your high school reentry program should have to maximize student success:
Social responsibility continues to grow in importance for consumers. In a 2013 survey by Nielsen, 50 percent of customers said they would be willing to reward companies that give back to society by paying more for their goods and services.1 As consumers become increasingly interested in the social impact of the companies behind the products and services they buy, companies are feeling the pressure to become more socially responsible. Luckily, there are varied approaches companies can take when they make an effort to benefit society at large. Take note from these socially responsible companies positively impacting their communities and growing their brand reputation.
In the spirit of "Aligning the Future," the theme of APSCU's (now CECU) 2016 Annual Conference on June 6th, Penn Foster joined the conversation by discussing the positive impact on non-traditional learners that  blended learning programs can produce for students. While introducing the findings from the Center for Promise's latest report on blended learning, we shared some of the best practices organizations have utilized when implementing successful blended approaches on their campuses.
Unemployment dropped dramatically over the past few years, holding steady at 5 percent through the first quarter of 2016. While this is good news for the economy as a whole, it makes the job more difficult for staffing professionals. In this bullish job market, recruiters find themselves battling significant obstacles when it comes to attracting and retaining highly qualified candidates.
Non-English speakers face a dilemma in leveraging the opportunities your workforce board provides; they may be some of the people most in need of your services, but the least likely to take advantage of them due to language barriers. Serve those who speak Spanish, French, Portuguese, Chinese or any other language spoken in your community by hiring bilingual employees. Let's look at how hiring bilingual employees benefits your clients and your career center:
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For many Americans, "higher education" still means a four-year degree. However, with unemployment hovering around 5.5 percent and with many students graduating from four-year institutions unable to find jobs, our perception of the costs and benefits of education needs to change. Degrees that prepare students for middle-skilled careers are often ignored or rejected, but education leaders need to realize that, as valuable as four-year degrees may be, they are not practical for every student, especially given that these students are saddled with an average of $26,600 of debt overall,1 and $32,700 when graduating from for-profit colleges.2
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Keeping students motivated as the end of the school year approaches is notoriously challenging. There's even a quasi-official term for it when it happens during their senior year: "senioritis." Seniors may experience end-of-the-year apathy more intensely than other students, but all grade levels face the same issue and pose the same challenge to educators.

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