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Des Sinkevich

Social Media and Content Coordinator

As a Content Coordinator, Des ideates and develops content for partners, students, and their advocates with the goal of providing new information and insight into the expanding landscape of online learning and skills training. Leave this style for all authors - Do Not Remove

18 Results for Author Des Sinkevich

Person petting puppy in shelter.
Having a clear social mission as a business is no longer a plus, it’s a priority. For large and small companies alike, corporate responsibility and social impact initiatives are vital to building a brand that aligns with consumer values and contributes to a greater good. But launching a social impact program needs to come from a place of authenticity and truth; empty platitudes geared toward gaining good press without action can backfire.
Vets working on dog.
Veterinary medicine is currently a $45.9 billion dollar industry and that number is only expected to grow over the next decade. As more pet owners consider their animals to be an essential part of the family, they’re focusing on securing high quality veterinary care. In order to provide that, your veterinary practice should be aware of the challenges the industry could face, as well as commonly shared goals in the field. We surveyed 80 practice managers and practice owners to better understand the state of the industry in 2020 and what needs practices have to grow their client list, improve both employee and client retention, and more. Here’s what we learned.
Employee wearing personal protective equipment.
Today, companion animals are considered members of the family,and veterinary practices are vital to maintaining the health and happiness of the pets we love. As the world settles into the “new normal” in response to the COVID-19 crisis, essential businesses like vet clinics and hospitals are working ceaselessly to establish a balance between providing customers and clients with service and keeping employees safe. As veterinary healthcare is already a high-stress field for employees, implementing safety measures and following state and federal guidelines isn’t only beneficial for employee mental and physical health - it’s vital to ensuring your practice weathers this unprecedented global event.
Two people using laptops.
Over the last decade, online learning and training have become the norm for forward-thinking employers looking to upskill their workforce and build effective career paths that increase employee retention rates. The benefits of digital workforce development are extensive, with the return on investment often far outpacing expected outcomes. But successfully implementing a training program for your workers doesn’t end at simply offering education options; you have to ensure adoption and engagement from the outset. One easy strategy? Help your learners navigate online training from day one.
Cat with veterinary worker.
At VMX 2020, one of the world’s leading veterinary conferences, over 17,000 industry leaders and professionals gathered to engage in immersive workshops and continuing education opportunities, sharing thoughts, practices, and guidelines for improving quality patient care. Throughout the event, one trend became increasingly clear: the health and wellness of dedicated veterinarians, veterinary technicians, and veterinary assistants is crucial to ensuring employee retention and practice growth.
Man reviewing data on a tablet.
Is the skills gap real? Whether you believe it’s a business boogeyman that lurks in the dark imaginations of overworked hiring managers, or you see it as a problem for your LinkedIn connections, you might agree on this one thing: it won’t affect your industry. After all, roles at your company are in demand and you have more applicants than positions to fill. For now. In reality, it’s not some big, ominous thing. Rather, the skills gap is simply the gap between what employers want or need their employees to be able to do, and what they can actually do.
Recruiting and retaining dedicated employees who are a good match for your company, and are passionate, reliable, and talented is a struggle for hiring managers in any industry. In a high-stress field such as animal medicine, it can be especially laborious for practice hiring managers to source, train, and retain skilled talent. It becomes even more so when your candidates need to meet certain prerequisites, such as experience in the field, basic knowledge of how animal medicine works, and - depending on the position - national credentials. Adding to the often arduous and expensive process, hiring managers or veterinarians also must balance the workload for current staff and attempt to ameliorate potential problems in order to avoid the higher than average turnover veterinary practices face.
High employee turnover is a growing issue in a myriad of industries, from manufacturing to retail, and can cost a company over 30% of annual wages per vacant position. The Society for Human Resource Management estimates that it takes forty-two days, on average, to fill an open position and the cost-per-hire hovers around $4,129. Recruiting and retaining quality candidates is a priority for employers and, in order to find top talent that will offer a return on their investment, some are using a sense of exclusivity to cull the herd of applicants. However, in order to hire and keep employees who are passionate about what they do and who will grow with the company, transparency and inclusivity are a must. "Find a reason to hire a candidate," Marie Davis, Penn Foster's Director of National Employer Partnerships, says, "not a reason to turn them away."
It's no secret that the modern workforce is in flux. Advances in automation and technology continue to transform the American economy and with it, the skills required to secure meaningful work. Combined with a growing skills gap, the workforce landscape in the United States is changing at a rapid pace. The solution is complicated. It will require government reform and creating educational pathways that lead to a secure future, and will take the joined efforts of industry experts in education, training, and workforce development, in tandem with policy makers, to navigate the new skills economy. 
The concept that a four-year university degree is the only path that leads to meaningful, lucrative employment is outdated. In many ways, it's an ideal that can't keep pace with the swift technological advancement that is impacting employers and workers in a variety of industries. Employers struggle to find trained talent to fill skilled or middle-skilled roles. Workers, many of whom rely on steady employment and income, can't afford to take time from that work to learn in a classroom setting, let alone pay the exorbitant tuition of colleges and universities. And, if they do take that time, the degree earned doesn't necessarily provide them with the skills that employers look for, leaving many workers underemployed at best.

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