Home > Blog

Des Sinkevich

Social Media and Content Coordinator

As a Content Coordinator, Des ideates and develops content for partners, students, and their advocates with the goal of providing new information and insight into the expanding landscape of online learning and skills training. Leave this style for all authors - Do Not Remove

38 Results for Author Des Sinkevich

Small dog in veterinary office.
There is no doubt that the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic will be long-reaching, affecting almost all industries well into the future. In order to survive and thrive post-pandemic, being able to pivot and adapt to the changes is a must. For the veterinary industry, which has seen an influx of new patients and clients due to an increase in pet ownership, a change in processes has already made a difference for practices across the country. From leveraging technology to improving communication, here’s how the pandemic has changed the way veterinary practices do business presently, which could carry forward post-pandemic.
Coworkers doing online training.
In business, for a program or plan to be considered a success, it needs to show positive return on investment (ROI). With sales metrics and revenue benchmarks, it’s fairly easy to measure the return and impact of your strategy. However, for strategies and plans involving human capital, getting a clear picture of how your investment in workforce training effects the business isn’t quite as straightforward. People are variable. But it’s also true that people – human capital – are essential to growing your business, revenue, and improving retention rates. As a necessary investment for employers, understanding the impact of effective workforce training can help you build a strong program with positive results for your employees and business.
Vet tech examining patient.
Veterinary technicians have become essential personnel during the pandemic, adapting to curbside appointments and telehealth to allow the veterinarians to focus on more dire client cases. While veterinary technicians are vital to a well-run practice in any year, this one has been even more challenging, and they’ve met that challenge head on. That makes celebrating their accomplishments and dedication during National Veterinary Technician Week especially important in 2020. Our Veterinary Academy staff, partners, and distinguished alumni came together to offer knowledge, hope, and encouragement to veterinary technicians across the country. If you missed a session or want to share the discussion with staff and learners, check out the recap of the week below.
Multi-colored cat.
As veterinary clinics continue to juggle an influx of new pet owners and increasing wellness checks from current owners, all while navigating updated covid-19 restrictions, credentialed vet techs have become more essential than ever. While the hard work of dedicated technicians has been celebrated each year during Veterinary Technician Week this year’s celebration is a special one. As essential workers, veterinary technicians have been on the front lines during the pandemic, ensuring the wellness of clients’ family pets. Rounding out a week of webinars, celebration, and awareness of what it takes to be a veterinary technician, Banfield Pet Hospital President, Brian Garish, took time to chat with Keyana Beamon, a Banfield employee and Penn Foster 2020 Graduate of the Year.
Woman in telehealth appointment.
Telemedicine isn’t a new concept in the healthcare industry, though until recently, in-person visits were the standard method of connecting with a provider. But since the start of the pandemic, telehealth has experienced a surge as patients and providers seek a socially distant option for appointments. For busy veterinary practices, offering this service in place of wellness visits can allow veterinarians and veterinary technicians to effectively see and treat more clients, potentially increasing revenue and allowing the practice to thrive throughout and after the pandemic.
Veterinarian with cat.
Despite the pandemic, the veterinary healthcare industry has been overwhelmed with patients and appointments. While other sectors, from healthcare to manufacturing, have been forced to furlough workers veterinary practices have had to hire more team members to meet their clients’ needs. With a deficit of trained, skilled veterinary assistants, practices are feeling the strain of increased appointments and teams are stretched thin attempting to keep up.
Pharmacy tech preparing medication.
As the pandemic continues to change the healthcare landscape, frontline workers are more heavily relied-on than ever before. For retail pharmacies facing increased workloads due to a growth in demand for prescription drugs, in addition to taking on more direct-care work before and during the spread of COVID-19, the need for skilled pharmacy technicians is great. But finding the right applicants to fill open positions isn’t always easy. In order to minimize the cost of constant turnover by increasing employee retention, a focus on training and certifying pharmacy technicians is a must.
veterinarian and vet tech helping patient.
Contrary to expectations, veterinary medicine has been one of the few industries to thrive - and even grow - amid the global COVID-19 pandemic. While many companies, large and small, have been forced to furlough employees or cut hiring budgets, veterinary practices have had to add new team members to handle the influx of new patients. In addition to the number of new pet owners, the veterinary industry has also seen a boom as pet parents are home more often to keep a diligent eye on the strange behaviors of their animals. With the influx of clients - from new pet owners to those who want to ensure their companion stays as healthy as possible - well trained and skilled veterinary staff is a must to ensure your practice’s success.
Woman working on laptop with stethoscope.
The healthcare industry has been one of the hardest hit since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. While thought to be recession proof, 1.4 million healthcare jobs were lost in April, following up the 43,000 that were originally displaced in March. But, as states slowly reopen and new safety protocols are put into place, healthcare jobs are making a revival - but not in the ways they existed before. Physicians and nurses aren’t the most in-demand roles that need to be filled; rather support positions are where the opportunities lie for workers and employers alike.
Man and woman gardening.
In less than five years, millennial workers are primed to make up 75% of the American workforce. 94% of those millennials want to use their skills to benefit a cause, and 57% wish there were more company-wide service days. With a majority of the workforce focused on social change and community responsibility, brands that want to thrive today and in the future need to view corporate responsibility strategy and company culture as essential parts of their job-marketing process. These are vital to enticing a younger generation that wants to do work that does social good. Not only can a focus on doing good attract potential hires, but it can also help your company retain current employees and build a strong brand reputation that pulls in new clients.

Search Our Blog Posts

Get the latest on skills, talent, and economic opportunity

Connect With Penn Foster

Human Resources Today