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86 Results for Category Employee Retention

Space shuttle launching.
During Learn Launch 2020, there was a trend in sessions whose titles used the term “future” in some capacity. That’s unsurprising considering as people and leaders we’re always preparing for what’s next, but something an audience member said woke me up. She said, essentially, that we have to stop talking about the “future of work” because it gives us permission to assume we have time to change.
Doctor checking on patient in bed.
If you’re wondering how to recruit healthcare workers, you’re not alone. For almost three decades, hospitals and other healthcare facilities have struggled to fill open positions. The problem is likely to get even worse, as the Bureau of Labor Statistics projects 14% growth in the healthcare industry, with the addition of 2.4 million new jobs by 2026. While good compensation and strong traditional benefits packages certainly have a role to play, healthcare employers can do more to stand out in the lean healthcare talent marketplace. Most importantly, don’t focus exclusively on attracting new employees. Implement policies, cultures, and training programs that support your existing talent pool. Here are our best tips for attracting and retaining healthcare employees based on real-world experience from our education partners.
Stethoscope on fabric.
Turnover is a major issue in the healthcare sector, which is why increasing employee retention is a top priority for many hospitals and clinics. You might think that higher salaries are the key to retaining workers. While salary increases may help, there are other powerful employee retention strategies you can use.
Man examining specimen with microscope.
The demand for healthcare employees has been growing for years with no signs of slowing down. To fill open positions and plan for the future, smart healthcare providers are building talent pipelines that will help them meet their staffing needs, which will be critical as the organization grows or as specialized services need to be offered.
The pace of change in the modern workplace means that your employees must learn continuously.
High employee turnover is a growing issue in a myriad of industries, from manufacturing to retail, and can cost a company over 30% of annual wages per vacant position. The Society for Human Resource Management estimates that it takes forty-two days, on average, to fill an open position and the cost-per-hire hovers around $4,129. Recruiting and retaining quality candidates is a priority for employers and, in order to find top talent that will offer a return on their investment, some are using a sense of exclusivity to cull the herd of applicants. However, in order to hire and keep employees who are passionate about what they do and who will grow with the company, transparency and inclusivity are a must. "Find a reason to hire a candidate," Marie Davis, Penn Foster's Director of National Employer Partnerships, says, "not a reason to turn them away."
The retail sector is under siege. Ecommerce is invading the retail space and not even industry giants are immune to their attacks. Consider the fall of Sears and Toys R Us. While retailers can't prevent the rise of ecommerce, there is one threat they can control, employee churn.
Finding qualified workers is more challenging than ever. A low unemployment rate, the changing role of technology, and workers who are less willing to relocate all contribute to the problem. The challenge is so pervasive in such a wide range of industries across the country, that the Federal government has taken notice.
Imagine it's the start of the new year and you're looking for ways to tighten up the budget and improve efficiency. You find yourself considering employee training. How can you make it worth the time and effort? How can you determine what you will get out of it?
The media loves to talk about how big name companies like Target, Chipotle and Starbucks offer education benefits to their employees. In May, Walmart announced a $1 a day college tuition plan that set off a wave of media speculation. An astute observer will realize that these businesses have a bigger motivation than just looking good in the press.

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