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Man and woman gardening.
In less than five years, millennial workers are primed to make up 75% of the American workforce. 94% of those millennials want to use their skills to benefit a cause, and 57% wish there were more company-wide service days. With a majority of the workforce focused on social change and community responsibility, brands that want to thrive today and in the future need to view corporate responsibility strategy and company culture as essential parts of their job-marketing process. These are vital to enticing a younger generation that wants to do work that does social good. Not only can a focus on doing good attract potential hires, but it can also help your company retain current employees and build a strong brand reputation that pulls in new clients.
Two men shaking hands.
Middle-skilled workers are among the 44 million Americans who struggle to find work, and as the world has settled into a new world of work amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, that challenge is becoming more difficult. Additionally, hiring practices rooted in a degree-first approach may be exacerbating the disparity between open positions and those qualified to fill them. As the United States unemployment rate hits 11.1% - that’s 17.75 million Americans out of work - employers in some of the hardest hit industries can’t afford to quibble over degrees and inflated credentials when it comes to hiring. In order to stem the tide of a devastating skills gap and attempt to address a growing recession, employers need to change how they define qualified applicants.
Laptop and coffee on desk.
Until recently, most Americans valued higher education above any other preparation for the workforce. Parents advised their children to go to college so they could get a good job. Employers identified top candidates based on who had a college degree. The implication was that a college education represented the highest standard for employee training. Today, those attitudes are shifting. Both employers and employees are beginning to recognize that workers need more than academic knowledge to succeed on the job.
Two people using laptops.
Over the last decade, online learning and training have become the norm for forward-thinking employers looking to upskill their workforce and build effective career paths that increase employee retention rates. The benefits of digital workforce development are extensive, with the return on investment often far outpacing expected outcomes. But successfully implementing a training program for your workers doesn’t end at simply offering education options; you have to ensure adoption and engagement from the outset. One easy strategy? Help your learners navigate online training from day one.
Group of people sitting at table with laptops.
Since lines between our work and home lives have blurred more than ever before, it’s vital for employers to encourage as much balance as is possible for their employees’ physical and mental well-being. There are small yet effective steps that businesses can take, if they haven’t already, to help employees perform their best during this stressful time, while maintaining their sanity.
Space shuttle launching.
During Learn Launch 2020, there was a trend in sessions whose titles used the term “future” in some capacity. That’s unsurprising considering as people and leaders we’re always preparing for what’s next, but something an audience member said woke me up. She said, essentially, that we have to stop talking about the “future of work” because it gives us permission to assume we have time to change.
For many in the service industry, the struggle to balance life and a retail shift schedule leaves little time for chasing career aspirations or returning to a traditional brick and mortar institution. And the opportunity to apply for jobs with better hours, better pay, or greater responsibilities often require a high school diploma. This can leave valuable workers like Chantel Maull, a two-year employee of Church's Chicken without many options for improvement. But Chantel has a lot to celebrate having recently earned both a high school diploma and a promotion from her employer. 
While libraries have significantly evolved over the last decade to become more technologically advanced, they have also progressed considerably when it comes to providing educational services to their patrons. This is especially important in a time when 73% of American adults consider themselves lifelong learners.1 Nick Buron, Chief Librarian at a location that serves nearly 2.3 million patrons, takes it one step further and insists that lifelong learning is "no longer a luxury " it is a necessity."
The pace of change in the modern workplace means that your employees must learn continuously.
When you select a training and education program for your staff, you're looking for more than ways to upskill employees. You're looking for a training partner who can help you realize a positive return on investment for your efforts.

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