Credit Recovery

Credit Recovery & Individual Courses

Penn Foster offers an extensive catalogue of individual course options for the purpose of original credit, credit recovery and electives for our general, advanced and condensed track curriculums.

All individual courses listed are worth one Penn Foster High School credit, unless otherwise indicated. Please note, when transferring the credit(s) back to the school you are attending, credit value per course will be determined by your school. We’ll work with your school to determine which courses will transfer and how many credits courses will be worth.

The advanced courses are part of our most academically challenging curriculum and are designed to prepare students pursuing admissions into 4-year institutions¹. The condensed courses target the most critical standards and objectives and are designed to be completed in six weeks. These courses contain 30-40 hours of study time and are not intended to be used for original credit.

Credit Recovery & Individual Courses

Mathematics

  • Algebra I (1 credit)

    A study of basic operations with signed numbers, monomials, and polynomials. Also includes formulas, equations, inequalities, graphing, exponents, roots, quadratic equations, and algebraic fractions.
  • Algebra I Advanced (1 credit)


    Algebra 1A

    Algebra 1A introduces students to the basics of algebra, including algebraic operations, equations, proportional reasoning and statistics, linear functions, inequalities, absolute values, and systems of equations.

    Algebra 1B

    Algebra 1B provides the foundation for higher math. It includes instruction on exponents and exponential functions, polynomials, factoring, quadratic functions, rational functions, coordinate geometry, probability, functions, and transformations.
  • Algebra I Common Core (1 Credit*)

    This course is aligned with the Common Core State Mathematics Standards, those specifically in Algebra I and includes graded performance assessments that require students to apply their knowledge. This course is designed to help students to formalize and extend the mathematics that students learned in the middle grades. With Algebra I, the critical areas deepen and extend understanding of linear and exponential relationships by contrasting them with each other and by applying linear models to data that exhibit a linear trend, and students engage in methods for analyzing, solving, and using quadratic functions.

    *Half credit courses (semester 1 or semester 2) are also available.
  • Algebra I Condensed (1 credit)

    Algebra 1 summer school includes an overview of the following topics: patterns, operations, equations, proportional reasoning, linear functions, inequalities, absolute values, exponents and exponential functions, polynomials, factoring, quadratic functions, rational functions, radicals, probability, and functions and transformations.
  • Algebra II (1 credit)

    A study of algebraic functions, ratios, proportions, logarithms, variations, progressions, theorems, matrices, determinants, inequalities, permutations, and probability.
  • Algebra II Advanced (1 credit)


    Algebra 2A

    Students in Algebra 2A study data and linear representations, numbers and functions, linear equations, inequalities, matrices, quadratic functions, and polynomial functions. While studying these topics, students will learn the relevance of their new knowledge to practical applications.

    Algebra 2B

    In Algebra 2B, students study exponential and logarithmic functions; rational functions and radical functions; conic sections, including parabolas, circles, ellipses, and hyperbolas; discrete mathematics, including counting principles, probability, series, patterns, and statistics.
  • Algebra II Common Core (1 Credit*)

    This course is aligned with the Common Core State Mathematics Standards, those specifically in Algebra II and includes graded performance assessments that require students to apply their knowledge. Building on their work with linear, quadratic, and exponential functions, students increase their understanding of functions to include polynomial, rational, and radical functions. Students work closely with the expressions that define the functions, and continue to solve equations, including solving quadratic equations over the set of complex numbers and solving exponential equations using the properties of logarithms.

    *Half credit courses (semester 1 or semester 2) are also available.
  • Algebra II Condensed (1 credit)

    This course includes a good review of the following topics: data and linear representations, numbers and functions, systems of linear equations and inequalities, quadratic functions, polynomial functions, rational functions, radical functions, conic sections, and statistics.
  • Business Math (1 credit)

    A review of basic math skills and principles along with a study of various business math topics such as income, maintaining a checking account, interest, installment buying, discounts, and markups.
  • Calculus (1 credit)

    Explains the derivative of a function and the applications of derivatives, the integral and how to use it, and methods of integration.
  • Consumer Math (1 credit)

    Simple ways to apply mathematics to the everyday areas of life, most of them involving money: employment, purchases, home, car, insurance, savings, and investments.
  • Consumer Math Advanced (1 credit)


    Consumer Math A

    Consumer Math A covers the mathematical tools and concepts that enable students to function effectively in the world of business and personal finance. Topics include gross and net pay, sales commissions, income tax, banking services, loans, credit cards, money management skills, shopping for a home and a car, and mortgages.

    Consumer Math B

    Consumer Math B begins with a study of personal insurances (life, disability, and health) and investments. The remainder of the course covers how businesses operate. Students study business data analysis, business technologies, managing people and inventory, sales and marketing, and international business.
  • Consumer Math Condensed (1 credit)

    Consumer math summer school is designed to be completed in six weeks. The course covers the mathematical tools people need to function effectively in the world of business and personal finance. Topics include wages, the income tax system, banking services, loans, credit cards, buying a car and a home, insurance, salary increases, business costs, sales, and marketing.
  • General Math I (1 credit)

    A study of the fundamental operations with whole numbers, fractions, and decimals, preceding the more advanced topics of weights, measures, ratios, proportions, and percents.
  • General Math II (1 credit)

    A study of the fundamental operations with whole numbers, fractions, and decimals, preceding the more advanced topics of weights, measures, ratios, proportions, and percents.
  • Geometry (1 credit)

    A study of the properties of points, lines, planes, and angles; polygons and triangles; circles; solids.
  • Geometry Advanced (1 credit)


    Geometry A

    Geometry A provides numerous hands-on activities to help students understand the deep theoretical relationships between lines, angles, polygons, circles, and three-dimensional figures. Specifically, students study length and angles; proofs and theorems; introductory logic; polygons; parallels; congruence; perimeter and area of triangles, parallelograms, and trapezoids; circumference and area of circles; the Pythagorean Theorem; solid shapes; coordinates in three dimensions; lines and planes in space; and perspective drawing.

    Geometry B

    Geometry B provides numerous hands-on activities to help students understand the deep theoretical relationships between lines, angles, polygons, circles, and three-dimensional figures. Specifically, students study area and volume of prisms, pyramids, cylinders, cones, and spheres; similarities in shapes; area and volume ratios; elements of circles (chords, arcs, tangents, inscribed angles and arcs, and secants); elements of trigonometry; graph theory; fractal geometry; and proof and logic.
  • Geometry Common Core (1 Credit*)

    This course is aligned with the Common Core State Mathematics Standards, those specifically in Geometry and includes graded performance assessments that require students to apply their knowledge. This course assists students in exploring more complex geometric situations and deepen their explanations of geometric relationships. Throughout this course, various activities will present the theoretical relationships between lines, angles, polygons, transformations, trigonometry, circles, and three-dimensional figures. The student will discover the relevance of these topics in their practical applications and the connections between mathematical topics, making them much easier to remember. More importantly, students have the opportunity to gain many powerful tools of logic and proof, which will enhance their skills for decision making.

    *Half credit courses (semester 1 or semester 2) are also available.
  • Geometry Condensed (1 credit)

    This course includes numerous hands-on activities to clarify the deep theoretical relationships between lines, angles, polygons, circles, and three-dimensional figures. Specific topics include parallels, polygons, triangle congruence, perimeter, area, shapes, surface area, volume, similar shapes, circles, trigonometry, proof, and logic.
  • Pre-Algebra Advanced (1 credit)


    Pre-Algebra A

    As you make your way through this online course, you'll encounter many challenges and rewards. You'll develop fluency with rational numbers and proportional relationships. In addition, you'll learn mathematical concepts that will provide a transition into formal algebra and geometry. You'll also develop multiple strategies for analyzing situations. As your problem-solving abilities increase through exploration of sophisticated, relevant problems, your life and education opportunities will expand, and your knowledge and decision-making skills will improve.

    Pre-Algebra B

    During this semester, you'll develop fluency with ratios, similarity, and percents to solve problems. You'll find theoretical and experimental probabilities, estimate probabilities, use The Fundamental Counting Principle, and convert between probability and odds of a specified outcome. You'll also solve and graph multistep equations and inequalities, find terms in sequences, represent functions, and identify and graph functions.
  • Pre-Algebra Condensed (1 credit)

    Students in pre-algebra perform operations and solve problems involving equations, inequalities, graphs, integers, exponents, scientific notation, rational numbers, real numbers, perimeter and area of plane figures, three-dimensional geometry, ratios, proportions, percents, and probability.
  • Pre-Calculus Common Core (1 Credit*)

    This course, where appropriate, is mapped to the Common Core State Mathematics Standards, Grades 9-12 and includes graded performance assessments that require students to apply their knowledge. This course is designed to help students to obtain a solid foundation in Algebra and Trigonometry and prepare them for future courses in mathematics. Students are shown how Algebra and Trigonometry can be modeled to solve real world problems while developing problem-solving skills and encouraging critical thinking.

    *Half credit courses (semester 1 or semester 2) are also available.

Career

  • Automotive Engine Theory Advanced (1 credit)

    Students will learn about engine types, engine parts and operations, lubrication, cooling, and ignition systems. The course concludes with in-depth coverage of engine diagnosis, disassembly, rebuild and reassembly.
  • Bookkeeping I Advanced (1 credit)

    Bookkeeping 1 focuses on the basic principles of common bookkeeping practices. Students learn the basics of the accounting equation and the structure of the basic books in accounting. The course also includes coverage of assets, liabilities, equity, revenues, expenses, and financial reports.
  • Bookkeeping II Advanced (1 credit)

    This course is a continuation of bookkeeping 1 that covers accounting systems, wholesale accounting, end-of-the-month activities as applied to accounting practice, as well as a brief introduction to computer applications for bookkeeping and accounting. This course concludes with the completion of a bookkeeping project.
  • Computer Art Advanced (1 credit)

    This course teaches students the fundamentals of computer art using the popular commercial software package Adobe Illustrator. Students learn the basics of good design and the basic principles of graphic design. The course also provides instruction on the basic operations of Adobe Illustrator.
  • Construction Theory Advanced (1 credit)

    This course provides detailed coverage of the theory and practices used in today's residential construction industry. The course includes math skills specific for the building trades, interpreting construction drawings, tool identification and safety and framing techniques for basic house construction.
  • Dental Assisting Theory I Advanced (1 credit)

    In this course students learn the basic theory of the dental practice as it applies to the dental assistant. Coverage includes dental law and ethics, dental terminology and anatomy, cavity classification, the procedures of the dental operatory, and safety practices related to disease transmission and infection control.
  • Dental Assisting Theory II Advanced (1 credit)

    This course is a continuation of Dental Assisting Theory 1. Students learn about OSHA regulations applicable to dental practice, radiology theory, pharmacology and anesthesiology, applications of dental materials and an overview of dental specialties. Students will also learn business and office practice techniques for the dental office and the basic operations of practice management software.
  • Digital Design Advanced (1 credit)

    This course is designed to develop basic entry-level skills required for careers in the digital publishing industry. The content includes computer skills, digital publishing concepts and operations; layout, design, and measurement activities; and digital imaging.
  • Electricity Advanced (1 credit)

    Electricity enables students to develop the essential competencies for working in the construction electricity industry. These competencies include safety practices, direct-current electrical-circuit skills, appropriate communication and math skills, basic electricity and electrical codes and employability skills.
  • Electronics Technology I Advanced (1 credit)

    This course provides students with an introduction to the knowledge, human relations, and technical skills of electronics technology.
  • Electronics Technology II Advanced (1 credit)

    This course provides students with an intermediate understanding of the knowledge, human relations, and technical skills of electronics technology.
  • Food Preparation Theory Advanced (1 credit)

    This course introduces students to the processes and practices of professional food preparation. Students will learn the tools and organization of a gourmet kitchen and food preparation techniques for soups, fruits and vegetables, meat and poultry, grains and pasta. The course also teaches baking techniques and an introduction to world cuisines.
  • Health Science Advanced (1 credit)

    This course is designed to introduce students to basic medical terminology and body systems as well as provide an overview of the factors relating to the transmission of disease.
  • HVAC Theory Advanced (1 credit)

    HVAC theory will introduce students to the concepts of the Heating Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) trade. This course provides instruction on basic electrical theory; the fundamentals of HVAC - including tools, safety, equipment and hardware; and the basics of refrigeration and heating and air conditioning.
  • Introduction to Interior Decorating Advanced (1 credit)

    Students will learn the basic principles of design and color as well as the most common styles and periods of furniture and how to identify them. Specific instruction is provided on decorating theory related to floors and walls, fabrics, and lighting. Students also learn the basics of how to decorate based on building plans and complete a decorating project.
  • Introduction to Paralegal Practice Advanced (1 credit)

    This course offers students an overview of the role and practice of the paralegal. Students learn legal terminology, the basic principles of law and the legal system and the professional and ethical practices expected of a paralegal. The course also covers elements of business law, civil and criminal litigation as well as legal research and writing.
  • Personal Training Theory I Advanced (1 credit)

    Students will learn the theory and terminology associated with exercise science and basic nutritional concepts necessary to maximize personal exercise programs. The course also covers essential topics related to cardio-respiratory theory and the basic concepts of muscular strength and endurance.
  • Personal Training Theory II Advanced (1 credit)

    This course is a continuation of Personal Training Theory 1. Students will learn strength conditioning concepts for the upper and lower body, flexibility training, injury prevention and stress management techniques. The course also covers the design of individual fitness programs and the legal and ethical issues related to the personal training industry.
  • Pharmacy Assisting I Advanced (1 credit)

    This course introduces the students to the skills required to assist a pharmacist in the role of a pharmacy assistant or pharmacy technician. Students will learn about the rules that govern pharmaceutical development and the operation of a typical pharmacy. The course also provides instruction of label preparation and prescription processing. The mathematical applications necessary for proficiency as a pharmacy assistant are also covered in this course.
  • Pharmacy Assisting II Advanced (1 credit)

    In this course students learn dispensing techniques for the most typical forms of retail pharmaceuticals. Students will also learn the basic chemistry of how drugs work; an overview of basic medical terminology, anatomy and physiology, and the most common drug classifications.
  • Plumbing Theory Advanced (1 credit)

    This course instructs students on the essential theory and practices employed by the plumbing profession. Students will learn math skills specific to the plumbing trade; plumbing tool identification and safety; plumbing connections; and the theory of installing plumbing fixtures.
  • Veterinary Assisting I Advanced (1 credit)

    This course is designed to develop competencies in areas such as the history of the animal industry; applied scientific and technological concepts; ecosystems; safety; and human relations skills.
  • Veterinary Assisting II Advanced (1 credit)

    This course is designed to develop competencies in areas such as global importance of the animal industry; career opportunities; animal behavior; animal welfare; and animal control.
  • Veterinary Assisting III Advanced (1 credit)

    This course is designed to develop competencies in the areas of animal digestive systems; animal breeding; preventive medicine and disease control; control of parasites; animal marketing; and analyzing records.
  • Web Design I Advanced (1 credit)

    This course is designed to provide a basic overview of the Internet, Intranet, and WWW. The content includes operating systems; basic HTML commands; navigation of the Internet, Intranet, and Web; and Web page design.

Health & Physical

  • Fitness & Nutrition (1 credit)

    Covers the forms and functions of the muscular, cardio respiratory and skeletal systems. Discusses the role of energy and mechanisms for transferring it to exercise. Shows you how to adapt exercise programs for those with special needs, and how to prevent and treat injuries. Describes the details of proper nutrition.
  • Fitness Topics Advanced (1 credit)

    You're probably aware of the effects of poor fitness, but do you know the real benefit of good fitness? Most exercise and physical fitness experts agree that good fitness benefits you both physically and mentally. Regular exercise and a healthy diet can lower your resting heart rate; keep veins and arteries elastic and free from obstruction; improve your lungs; burn calories; strengthen bones, joints, and muscles; reduce the risk of disease; alleviate the harmful effects of stress; and increase your ability to handle tension.

Science

  • Biology (1 credit)

    A study of characteristics of life, chemistry of cells, and the links between life and energy. Discusses evolution, ecosystems, heredity, and adaptation. Also covers human body systems and activities.
  • Biology Advanced (1 credit)


    Biology A

    In Biology A, students will explore the characteristics of life and the major common themes of biology, including evolution and homeostasis. They'll also investigate the ways that their actions and choices can affect both the living and nonliving components of Earth.

    Biology B

    In Biology B, students will analyze the defining characteristics of organisms belonging to different taxonomic groups and explore how evolution and natural selection produced this diversity from a common ancestor. Some of the specific topics covered are bacteria, protists, fungi, viruses, and the form and function of plants and animals.
  • Biology Condensed (1 credit)

    This biology course is designed to guide students to develop proficiency in biology. The course includes the following topics: the seven characteristics of life, evolution, homeostasis, cell structure and function, photosynthesis, metabolism, genetics, and ecology. The course also includes several links to hands-on laboratory experiences.
  • Chemistry (1 credit)

    A study of the structure and reactions of matter. Discusses elemental symbols, chemical reactions, and the role of energy in those reactions. Also covers organic and nuclear chemistry.
  • Chemistry Advanced (1 credit)


    Chemistry A

    Chemistry A provides a solid foundation of chemistry. It includes the following topics: the science of chemistry, matter and energy, atoms and moles, the Periodic Table, ions and ionic compounds, covalent compounds, the mole and chemical composition, chemical equations and reactions, stoichiometry (the science that deals with quantities of substances in chemical reactions), and causes of change.

    Chemistry B

    Chemistry B continues the foundations of Chemistry A. Specific topics include states of matter and intermolecular forces, gases, solutions, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, reaction rates, oxidation, reduction, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, carbon and organic compounds, and biological chemistry.
  • Chemistry Condensed (1 credit)

    In this course, students learn how to relate what they see in a laboratory to what's happening at the molecular level. They test ideas, gather data, relate concepts, and look inside the atom to see how its forces determine the properties of the elements. They see effects on reactions: what combines, how fast it combines, and how likely it is to explode. They also look at larger, more complicated molecules-the organic molecules-the ones that sustain life and comprise what people eat, what they wear, what makes their cars go, and even what makes up their bodies. Specific topics include matter, energy, atoms, moles, the periodic table, ions, ionic compounds, covalent compounds, chemical composition, chemical equations and reactions, stoichiometry, intermolecular forces, gases, solutions, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, carbon and organic compounds, oxidation, reduction, electrochemistry, and biological chemistry.
  • Earth Science (1 credit)

    A study of the scientific method, the formation of the solar system, the moon's phases, the movement of the earth, plate tectonics, the formation of the oceans, and erosion. Also looks at chemical principles, rock and mineral analysis, soil formation, and weather patterns.
  • Earth Science Advanced (1 credit)


    Earth Science A

    Earth Science A covers the structure, composition, and natural processes of Earth. It provides students with a basic knowledge of Earth, its features, its history, and its processes.

    Earth Science B

    In Earth Science B, students will learn about Earth, what's on it, what's in it, and how it works. They will test their ideas, gather data, and relate concepts. Students will analyze rocks, study earthquakes and volcanoes, examine fossils, explore the oceans, and even learn to predict weather.
  • Earth Science Condensed (1 credit)

    In this course, students learn about the planet they live on, what's on it, what's in it, and how it works. They test ideas, gather data, and relate concepts. They learn what the universe is made of-its tiniest particles and giant galaxies. They examine rocks, earthquakes, and fossils in their study of geology. They examine oceans, the history of the earth, and what's in the murky depths, hot and cold, as they study oceanography. Students also study meteorology, weather, astronomy, and Earth's place in the universe.
  • General Science (1 credit)

    A look at the basic principles of the entire spectrum of the sciences, including physics, chemistry, and biology. Explores atoms and molecules, light and sound, electricity and magnetism, astronomy, the rise of life on Earth, human anatomy, and genetics.
  • Physical Science (1 credit)

    A study of matter and energy: their nature and the relationships between them. Explains the role of atomic structure in chemical and nuclear reactions. Emphasizes problem-solving skills and discusses the relationship between science, technology, and the environment. Covers topics such as water, the chemistry of building materials, fuels, natural and synthetic rubbers and plastics, energy in relation to motion and force, machines, sound, light, electricity, and magnetism.
  • Physical Science Advanced (1 credit)


    Physical Science A

    Physical science includes both physics and chemistry. Physical Science A focuses on chemistry. Students will study the states and structures of matter; atoms; acids, bases, and salts; nuclear changes; and motion and energy.

    Physical Science B

    Physical Science B focuses mostly on physics. Students will study heat and temperature; waves, sound, and light; electricity and magnetism; and technology. This course also introduces students to earth and space science.
  • Physical Science Condensed (1 credit)

    This summer school course focuses mainly on chemistry. Specific topics include matter, states of matter, atoms, the periodic table, the structure of matter, chemical reactions, solutions, acids, bases, salts, nuclear changes, motion, forces, work, energy, heat, temperature, waves, sound, light, electricity, magnetism, and communication technology.
  • Physics Advanced (1 credit)


    Physics A

    Physics A begins with an introduction to the science of physics. It includes topics such as motion in one and two dimensions, vectors, forces and the laws of motion, work and energy, momentum and collisions, circular motion and gravitation, heat, thermodynamics, vibrations, and sound.

    Physics B

    Physics B covers light, reflection, refraction, interference, diffraction, electricity, magnetism, induction, atomic physics, and subatomic physics.
  • Physics Condensed (1 credit)

    Students in this course study the following topics: motion in one and two dimensions, vectors, work, energy, momentum, gravitation, heat, thermodynamics, vibrations, waves, sound, light, reflection, refraction, interference, diffraction, electric forces and fields, electric energy and current, circuits and circuit elements, magnetism, and electromagnetic induction.

Arts & Humanities

  • Art Appreciation (1 credit)

    An introduction to various forms of art throughout history, from prehistoric to modern; also discusses elements of design and symbolism and purposes of art to enable students to evaluate the meaning and quality of individual works. Learn about the most important artists of each era, as well as the cultural influences that shaped their approaches to painting, sculpture, or architecture.
  • Art Appreciation Advanced (.5 credit)

    This course will provide you with a basic knowledge of the history, media, techniques, tools, and cultural implications of the visual arts. By completing this course, you'll learn how art is and can be an integral part of your life.
  • Human Relations (1 credit)

    Methods of analyzing and improving relations with other people in personal life and working environments. Accents individual productivity, teamwork, working relationships, dealing with frustration, organizing, repairing relationships, and maintaining one's attitude.
  • Music (1 credit)

    Covers the forms of music through history, from medieval times to the present, and discusses music theory and instrumentation. Enables the student to evaluate the quality of music by active listening. Includes music CDs.
  • Music Appreciation Advanced (.5 credit)

    This course introduces you to basic music theory, analysis, and history in order to broaden your interest in and understanding of music.
  • Reading Skills (1 credit)

    A study of techniques applicable to any type of reading. Includes reviewing, predicting, scanning, finding the main idea, and drawing conclusions. Discusses how to determine word meanings by examining context clues, and differentiating fact from opinion to identify bias. Also covers poetry and fiction.

Business & IT

  • Business Software Applications Advanced (1 credit)

    This course is designed to develop proficiency using the advanced features of software programs to perform office-related tasks.
  • Computer Applications Advanced (.5 credit)

    Welcome to your course in Computer Applications! During your journey through this online course, you'll encounter many challenges and rewards. You'll begin by being introduced to the World Wide Web and the Dreamweaver Web site authoring application. You'll also learn the basic techniques used for designing Web pages and show you how to insert text, tables, pictures, and multimedia files. As you progress further into the course, you'll learn more advanced methods that will allow you to produce Web pages with greater efficiency. For example, you'll learn how to use Cascading Style Sheets, library items, and templates. The weekly homework assignments will help you plan and execute elements you'll need to incorporate into the project. In addition, an introduction to visual theory and page layout will help you design your page for maximum visual impact. By the end of the course, you'll have produced three distinct Web site projects of your own design!
  • Microsoft Office Advanced (.5 credit)

    Welcome to your introductory course on Microsoft Office! This online course uses step-by-step tutorials to teach the basic features of Microsoft Word®, PowerPoint®, and Excel®. The units of study are designed with project-based activities and hands-on practice to teach and reinforce skills. You'll become proficient in these applications so you can apply this knowledge in all areas of your education and life.
  • Microsoft Word & Excel (1 credit)

    Learn how to use Microsoft Word® 2016 to create, edit, and illustrate documents. Learn about the most widely used spreadsheet program, Microsoft Excel®. Excel® can perform numerical calculations and is also useful for non-numerical applications such as creating charts, organizing lists, accessing data, and automating tasks. The course has two multiple choice exams.
  • Small Business Management (1 credit)

    Provides an introduction on how to prepare to start your own business. Learn the basics of a business plan. This course is offered as an elective option.
  • Understanding Computers Advanced (.5 credit)

    When you complete this course, you'll be able to: Demonstrate a sound understanding of computer basics; Understand the ethical, cultural, and societal issues related to computers; Use technology as research tool; Understand the security risks in using computers; Use computers as a problem-solving and decision-making tool.

English

  • American Literature (1 credit)

    Includes a study of literary terms, structural elements of genres and interpreting selected works to read more effectively for both knowledge and enjoyment. Discusses what it has meant and now means to be an American as shown through each major period of American Literature.
  • American Literature Advanced (1 credit)


    American Literature A

    English 3A introduces students to American Literature. It includes readings from the beginning of writing on the America continent, including Native American poems and myths to the colonialists' observations of their new world, to the nineteenth-century romanticists and realists, to the writing of the early twentieth century. In addition to this reading, students are required to complete several graded writing assignments.

    American Literature B

    English 3B covers American literature from World War II to the present. Students will examine the interactions among current events of the time, the writer's purpose, the subject, and audience expectations. In the process, students will gain an appreciation of what it is to be American and the significant impact that American culture has had on the world.
  • American Literature Condensed (1 credit)

    In this course, students read from a variety of genres: poetry, short fiction, personal narrative, and speeches. The reading ranges from the beginnings of writing on the American continent including Native American poems and myths to the colonialists' observations of their new world, to the nineteenth century romanticists and realists, to the rugged, honest, and magical writing of the twentieth century.
  • Basic English (1 credit)

    Fundamentals of English for effective communication. Capitalization, punctuation, grammar, and spelling are covered, with an aim toward writing clearer sentences.
  • English Language Arts 1 Common Core (1 Credit*)

    This course is aligned with the English Language Arts Common Core Standards, Grades 9-10 and includes numerous graded performance assessments that require students to apply their knowledge. Through required readings and a variety of assignments, the student will develop analytical skills that will contribute to a better understanding of a variety of literary and informational texts, including foundational American documents. While acquiring the skills of comprehending, synthesizing and evaluating information, the student will have the opportunity to gain the confidence in their capability to make sound judgments both in literature and in the real world as well as gain the ability to communicate effectively to different audiences.

    This course references Collections Grade 9, which includes a variety of complex texts, including fiction, non-fiction, and informational text. The student is also required to read the Kite Runner in Semester 1 of this course.

    *Half credit courses (semester 1 or semester 2) are also available.
  • English Language Arts 2 Common Core (1 Credit*)

    This course is aligned with the English Language Arts Common Core Standards, Grades 9-10 and includes numerous graded performance assessments that require students to apply their knowledge. Through required readings and a variety of assignments, the student will develop analytical skills that will contribute to a better understanding of a variety of literary and informational texts, including foundational American documents. While acquiring the skills of comprehending, synthesizing and evaluating information, the student will have the opportunity to gain the confidence in their capability to make sound judgments both in literature and in the real world as well as gain the ability to communicate effectively to different audiences.

    This course references Collections Grade 10, which includes a variety of complex texts, including fiction, non-fiction, and informational text. The student is also required to read Kaffir Boy in Semester 1 and 1984 in Semester 2 of this course.

    *Half credit courses (semester 1 or semester 2) are also available.
  • English Language Arts 3 Common Core (1 Credit*)

    This course is aligned with the English Language Arts Common Core Standards, Grades 11-12 and includes numerous graded performance assessments that require students to apply their knowledge. Through required readings and a variety of assignments, the student will develop analytical skills that will contribute to a better understanding of a variety of literary and informational texts, including foundational American documents. While acquiring the skills of comprehending, synthesizing and evaluating information, the student will have the opportunity to gain the confidence in their capability to make sound judgments both in literature and in the real world as well as gain the ability to communicate effectively to different audiences.

    This course references Collections Grade 11, which includes a variety of complex texts, including fiction, non-fiction, and informational text. The student is also required to read Adventures of Huckleberry Finn in Semester 1 and The Great Gatsby in Semester 2 of this course.

    *Half credit courses (semester 1 or semester 2) are also available.
  • English Language Arts 4 Common Core (1 Credit*)

    This course is aligned with the English Language Arts Common Core Standards, Grades 11-12 and includes numerous graded performance assessments that require students to apply their knowledge. Through required readings and a variety of assignments, the student will develop analytical skills that will contribute to a better understanding of a variety of literary and informational texts, including foundational American documents. While acquiring the skills of comprehending, synthesizing and evaluating information, the student will have the opportunity to gain the confidence in their capability to make sound judgments both in literature and in the real world as well as gain the ability to communicate effectively to different audiences.

    This course references Collections Grade 12, which includes a variety of complex texts, including fiction, non-fiction, and informational text. The student is also required to read The Glass Castle in Semester 1 and To Kill a Mockingbird in Semester 2 of this course.

    *Half credit courses (semester 1 or semester 2) are also available.
  • English Communication (1 credit)

    Explains how to avoid grammatical errors when writing sentences and paragraphs, how to make words work for you, and how to improve your image by using the right word in the right place.
  • Grammar Advanced (1 credit)


    Grammar A

    In Grammar A, students will study the fundamentals of grammar, such as the structure of sentences and paragraphs, parts of speech, punctuation, and spelling; write and revise paragraphs until they effectively communicate their ideas; and develop a research paper.

    Grammar B

    In Grammar B, students will explore the power of words by analyzing poetry and studying the basic structures used by writers to shape their words into thoughtful and compelling compositions. Students will learn to identify the dominant structure of a composition and write engaging, persuasive, and informative compositions using these structures. They must apply skills and knowledge gained to analyze texts and poetry and to research and write a paper based on that research.
  • Grammar Condensed (1 credit)

    During this grammar course, students learn to write effective sentences and paragraphs; review how to identify and correct issues with grammar, punctuation, and usage; and develop competence in spelling.
  • Grammar & Literature Advanced (1 credit)


    Grammar & Literature A

    This course is designed to help you master essential reading and writing skills. Everything you learn in this course will provide you with skills that you can apply to just about any twenty-first-century career. People tend to listen more closely and agree with those who can communicate effectively. To accomplish writing more effectively, this course will also include many lessons in basic grammar. More specifically, you'll learn the basic rules of writing; including the parts of speech, parts of a sentence, phrases, and clauses. Additionally, you'll review the rules of punctuation, capitalization, and spelling to help you construct proper sentences and paragraphs. The grammar in this class will give you more confidence in work and social situations.

    Grammar & Literature B

    This course is designed to help you master essential reading and writing skills. Everything you learn in this course will provide you with skills that you can apply to just about any twenty-first-century career. People tend to listen more closely and agree with those who can communicate effectively. You'll practice your writing and speaking skills, and at the same time, you'll review the basics of English grammar that are the foundation of all communication; both verbal and written.
  • Literature (1 credit)

    Covers the reading of short stories, nonfiction, poetry, and drama. Intended to give a deeper appreciation of the relationship between literature and life, and of the pleasures and benefits of reading.
  • Literature I Advanced (1 credit)


    Literature 1A

    Through required readings and exercises, English 1A introduces literary elements such as plot, setting, character, narrator, voice, theme, irony, and symbolism. In addition, the course includes a number of graded writing assignments that require students to apply their knowledge of these elements.

    Literature 1B

    English 1B includes a number of different types of literary categories, including poetry, biographical and historical selections, an epic, a drama, and several types of workplace documents such as warranties and users' manuals. Students will improve their communication skills by applying what they learn to their own compositions.
  • Literature I Condensed (1 credit)

    English 1 Summer School introduces students to a variety of literature, including short stories, nonfiction, poetry, and drama. Through their reading, students learn about plot, setting, character, narrator, voice, irony, symbolism, style, and approach. Students must also complete two short writing assignments.
  • Literature II Advanced (1 credit)


    Literature 2A

    English 2A presents literary elements such as plot, setting, character, and conflict and applies these elements to specific reading selections. Students are required to complete a number of graded writing assignments to help them improve their reading and writing skills.

    Literature 2B

    English 2B explores authors' use of literary devices such as imagery and symbolism to convey meaning. Students will learn how to analyze and compare works of the same genre, and read and interpret popular media and workplace documents.
  • Literature II Condensed (1 credit)

    This course in literature helps students develop analytical skills that contribute to a better understanding of written works, more effective critical thinking skills, and improved writing techniques. Students study plot, foreshadowing, flashbacks, mood, tone, setting, voice, theme, and conflict. The course includes four short writing assignments.
  • Practical English (1 credit)

    Develops writing skills by emphasizing sentence structure, paragraphs, letters, and compositions. Opens with a study of grammar, including the parts of speech, punctuation, spelling, and word usage. Explains the writing process and emphasizes an individual approach.
  • World Literature Advanced (1 credit)


    World Literature A

    English 4A introduces literature from around the world. The course begins back thousands of years ago and presents ideas and stories of the ancient Middle East, Greece, Rome, Africa, and Asia. Students will analyze the texts they read and also complete a number of graded writing assignments.

    World Literature B

    English 4B includes writings gathered from around the world. It covers writings from the Middle Ages in Europe to modern China. In addition to reading the assigned selections, students also learn about times and places to better appreciate the texts they study.
  • World Literature Condensed (1 credit)

    Welcome to your course in World Literature! In other English courses you've taken, you've undoubtedly read many masterpieces of British and American literature. In this course, you'll be traveling the world. As in other literature courses, you'll need to learn about times and places, many of them remote and exotic, to better appreciate the texts that you'll study. Since these stories, poems, plays, and essays have been gathered from around the world, most of them weren't originally written in English. Fine translations and modern versions make it possible to enjoy experiences that would otherwise be out of reach. To profit from this course, you need only to open yourself to the richness of other cultures and to approach each text with curiosity and a willingness to learn. In a world made increasingly smaller by advances in transportation and communications, what better way to gain understanding and appreciation of other cultures than by reading their literature?
  • Written Communication (1 credit)

    Step-by-step instructions for handling sentence structure, paragraphing, punctuation, grammar, and pronunciation. Emphasizes practical writing techniques and library research. Topics include increasing vocabulary, understanding others better, and expressing oneself confidently.

Social Studies

  • American History (1 credit)

    Discussion of people, events, and sociopolitical forces that have shaped America, from its discovery to the present. Shows how American history affects today's events and global conditions.
  • American History Advanced (1 credit)


    American History A

    American History A covers the time period from the earliest natives through the late nineteenth century. It includes the discovery and settlement of the country by the Europeans; the English colonies and the war for independence; the forming of a new nation and its challenges; westward expansion, the Civil War, and reconstruction; and the immigration of people from diverse cultures and countries.

    American History B

    American History B traces the rise of the United States as a world power. It covers the period from the end of the nineteenth century to the present. Specifically, students study the age of reform, progressive politics, World War I, the Great Depression, the New Deal, World War II, the Cold War, civil rights, women's rights, the Vietnam War, and recent presidential terms (from Richard Nixon to George W. Bush)
  • American History Condensed (1 credit)

    This course concentrates on specific topics in American history. It begins by revisiting the early settlements and colonies, the American Revolution, the Republic's early years, and the Civil War. The second half covers Reconstruction, the American West, the Great Depression, and the New Deal, concluding with World War II and the Civil Rights Movement. This course provides an overview of the important progress and challenges the country has encountered in its history.
  • Civics (1 credit)

    Covers the rights, freedoms and responsibilities of American citizens. Reviews the roots of American government and studies the modern U.S. government — its branches; the Constitution and Bill of Rights; the roles of federal, state and local governments; political parties and elections. Discusses the relationships between America and other nations.
  • Civics Advanced (1 credit)


    Civics A

    In Civics A, students will gain a sound understanding and appreciation of the documents that are the foundation of the American constitutional democracy, such as the Constitution of the United States and Declaration of Independence; the organization of the United States government at all levels; the United States political system; and the role of citizens in government.

    Civics B

    Civics B explores the role of citizens in society, the economic system of the United States, and foreign policy.
  • Civics Condensed (1 credit)

    This course discusses the foundations of American governance, the definition of a citizen, and the rights and responsibilities of citizens. It also covers the American Constitution, the three branches of government, and the basic rights afforded to all Americans. Students learn about the structure of the federal government and how its leaders are elected. Students also gain some insight into the nature of America's state and local government, and the part citizens are expected to play to make the system work. Finally, students learn how the United States relates to the rest of the world through international relations and how America's political and economic systems take their place on the global stage.
  • Economics (1 credit)

    Compares and contrasts the economic systems that people use in various parts of the world. Discusses the function of money, the law of supply and demand, and the role of banks and government within capitalist economies.
  • Economics Advanced (1 credit)


    Economics A

    Economics A covers microeconomics, which focuses on how businesses move resources around the economy to produce products for sale to households, foreign markets, governments, and other businesses; and how households, businesses, governments, and the central bank work together to achieve a successful flow of resources for the economy as a whole.

    Economics B

    Economics B focuses on macroeconomics, which explores how consumers, businesses, and foreigners interact to determine the total amount of output, employment, and income for the economy. Macroeconomics also explores the general level of prices and how government policies (tax collections and expenditures) and central bank policies (money supply and interest rates) can be used to achieve a more favorable outcome.
  • Geography Advanced (1 credit)


    Geography A

    Geography A introduces students to maps, weather, climate, landforms, bodies of water, natural resources, population and cultural geography, economic geography, and urban and rural geography. The course then relates these factors to the areas of North and South America and Europe.

    Geography B

    Geography B covers Russia, Northern Eurasia, Asia, Africa, and the lands in the Pacific. Students will explore landforms, bodies of water, climate zones, natural resources, human populations, cultural diversity, historical forces, and economic systems of these areas.
  • Geography Condensed (1 credit)

    World Geography summer school is designed to be completed in six weeks. The course introduces students to maps, weather, climate, landforms, bodies of water, natural resources, population and cultural geography, economic geography, and urban and rural geography. The course then relates these factors to the areas of North and South America, Europe, Russia, Northern Eurasia, Asia, Africa, and the lands in the Pacific.
  • Psychology (1 credit)

    Provides an introduction to the roots and the development of modern psychology. Discusses states of consciousness, and theories of intelligence, development, and personality. Also looks at gender roles, stress, psychological disorders, and social factors that affect people in groups.
  • Psychology Advanced (1 credit)


    Psychology A

    Psychology A explores how psychologists unravel the mystery of what it is to be human, the biological processes that enable us to make sense of the world around us, how we learn and how we remember what we've learned, the nature of intelligence, and the relationship between thought and language.

    Psychology B

    Psychology B covers emotions, their components, and how they affect our lives. Specifically, the course examines motivation, human growth and development, gender roles, psychological tests, psychological disorders, therapies, and stress.
  • World Geography (1 credit)

    Shows the physical environment of human beings and the means they use to supply their political and economic needs. Includes maps, charts, graphs, and pictures of the main areas of the world.
  • World History Advanced (1 credit)


    World History A

    World History A begins with the dawn of civilization and tells the stories of the ancient civilizations in Africa, Europe, and Asia. Students will explore the art, geography, politics, philosophy, and culture of the Greeks and the Romans as well as the important features of early civilizations in Africa, the Americas, and the Middle East. Next, they'll study the rise of the Byzantine Empire, the dynasties of East Asia, the kings of early Russia, and the Islamic world. Finally, they'll examine the events of the Middle Ages, ending in the Renaissance and the Age of Exploration and Expansion.

    World History B

    Students in World History B will explore the eras of absolute monarchs, the Enlightenment, the Age of Imperialism, Industrialization, the devastating wars of the 1900s, and events to the present time. They'll also study geographic features and economic and political theories that have influenced governments that have risen and fallen through the years.
  • World History Condensed (1 credit)

    This world history summer school gives a capsulized review of the art, geography, politics, philosophy, and culture of the Greeks and the Romans, as well as the important features of early civilizations in Africa, the Americas, and the Middle East. The course also presents the rise of the Byzantine Empire, the dynasties of East Asia, the kings of early Russia, the Islamic world, the events of the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and the Age of Exploration and Expansion. Students explore the eras of absolute monarchs, the Enlightenment, the Age of Imperialism, industrialization, the devastating wars of the 1900s, and events to the present time. They also study geographic features and economic and political theories that have influenced governments that have risen and fallen throughout the years.

Vocational

  • Appliance Repair (1 credit)

    Get a head start toward a business of your own repairing home appliances. Includes details on using tools, testing electric appliances, relays, and motors.
  • Auto Repair Technician (1 credit)

    Learn about the automotive repair field, engine parts and operation, and engine types. Includes a practical exercise.
  • Basic Electronics (1 credit)

    Learn the fundamentals of electricity. You'll study conductors, insulators, batteries, circuit analysis, Ohm's law, and multimeter usage. Includes practical exercises, practice kits, and learning aids.
  • Bookkeeping (1 credit)

    Experts show you the basics you need to get into this moneymaking field. Learn about the accounting equation, assets, liabilities, owner's equity, and much more.
  • Catering & Gourmet Cooking (1 credit)

    Learn how to make money in your own food catering business. Topics include an introduction to catering, the dynamics of the catering business, food styles in catering, and alcoholic beverages.
  • Child Day Care Management (1 credit)

    Experts explain everything step by step: the benefits of child day care, licensing requirements, managing staff, and details on child growth and development. Features Ages and Stages Chart and Student Observation Guide.
  • Computer Assisted Small Business Management (1 credit)

    Provides an introduction on how to prepare to start your own business. Learn the basics of a business plan.
  • Dental Assistant (1 credit)

    Demand is on the rise around the U.S. for skilled Dental Assistants. Your Career Key elective includes information on dentistry and dental assisting, terms and anatomy, dentists and the law, and basic dental examinations. Learning aids and special supplements included with your program.
  • Desktop Publishing & Design (1 credit)

    This exciting program will introduce you to one of the fastest-growing computer career fields! Master the electronic publishing process, the elements of design, and the kinds of graphics and illustrations desktop publishers can create. Learning aids and special supplements included.
  • Drafting (1 credit)

    You don't need art experience or drawing skills to enjoy security, prestige, and income from this rewarding career field. Learn to use the drafters' world language, understand size and shape description, and project orthographic views.
  • Dressmaking & Design (1 credit)

    Get an introduction to sewing and start toward a moneymaking career in dressmaking. You’ll learn basic sewing, how to select fabrics, proper care of garments, and more. Includes practical exercises and learning aids.
  • Electrician (1 credit)

    Learn how to get started as an electrician, work with electrician's tools, and the basics of wiring in this fascinating program. Electricians make great money and demand is high in the construction and maintenance fields.
  • Floral Design (1 credit)

    Turn your love of flowers into a moneymaking business. You'll learn the basics here—care and handling of flowers, classifying flowers and plants, and the principles of design. Your course includes a bow tying DVD and learning aids.
  • Home Inspector (1 credit)

    Learn some of the most important parts of the Home Inspector's job. Discover the opportunities in this great field and how you can work part-time hours and earn full-time income. Learning aids and special supplements included.
  • Interior Design (1 credit)

    Be the one friends and neighbors rely on to make their homes look great. Lessons include how to meet a client's needs, design with furniture, and more. Client/Needs Analyzer and furniture template included.
  • Medical Office Assistant (1 credit)

    Get a look at what it's like to work side by side with doctors in the rewarding health care field. Topics include learning strategies, time and stress management, interpersonal communication, and law and medical ethics. Includes supplements on speaking and communication skills.
  • Personal Computer Specialist (1 credit)

    Topics include using and understanding Windows, understanding software, and adding software to your computer.
  • Pharmacy Technician (1 credit)

    An introduction to the Pharmacy Technician profession. Provides details on drug information sources, drug development, and drug manufacturers. Learning aids included.
  • Small Engine Repair (1 credit)

    Learn the basics of engine repair, including tool usage, small engine parts and operation, lubrication, cooling, and ignition systems.
  • Teacher Aide (1 credit)

    Discusses the skills needed to be a valuable member of the classroom team as a teacher aide. Topics include skills for the effective teacher aide, child development and human behavior, how children learn, and enhancing children's self-esteem.
  • Veterinary Assistant (1 credit)

    Start learning the skills you need to become a Veterinary Assistant. Topics include introduction to animal care, animal behavior, handling and restraint, and veterinary terminology. Includes access to an audio CD, pronunciation guides, and flash cards. This course is offered as an elective option.

Languages

  • Spanish (1 credit)

    Includes articulate speaking, active reading, and comprehensive listening. Covers the details of Spanish vocabulary and grammar, and improves fluency through listening to and creating stories. Enables you to learn and use the language for business situations and other purposes.
  • Spanish I Advanced (1 credit)


    Spanish 1A

    Spanish 1A introduces the fundamentals of Spanish vocabulary and grammar through reading, writing, and oral activities. It presents the basics of pronunciation and sets the groundwork for conversing in rudimentary Spanish. The course also includes an explanation of the differences in words used in Hispanic and Latino cultures, as well as the traditions, history, and geography of these cultures.

    Spanish 1B

    Spanish 1B builds on the Spanish vocabulary and grammar introduced in Spanish 1A. It introduces the vocabulary of communicating about such practical activities as ordering in a restaurant, cooking meals, keeping healthy, celebrating holidays, and taking vacations. The course also includes information on the cultures of several Spanish-speaking countries.
  • Spanish I Condensed (1 credit)

    This course reviews the basic grammar elements of a typical Spanish 1 course. Students work on improving their vocabulary and using correct grammar. Listening activities help to improve students' ability to understand Spanish. Their reading skills improve as they work through guided reading practice. Students also get a taste of different Spanish-speaking cultures that give them an inside glimpse into the customs and traditions of the people behind the language.
  • Spanish II Advanced (1 credit)


    Spanish 2A

    Spanish 2A continues the vocabulary and grammar instruction from Spanish 1. Students will increase their ability to express themselves in Spanish as they begin to use new words, phrases, and verb tenses. They'll also study the customs and traditions of people in different Spanish-speaking cultures.

    Spanish 2B

    Spanish 2B helps students improve their fluency and comprehension through practice in conversation. The emphasis is on speaking Spanish in daily life and studying the geography and history of selected Spanish-speaking countries. Students will also continue to expand their Spanish reading and writing skills.

¹ Remember, colleges have a variety of entry requirements, and not all colleges recognize all high school diplomas.