NCAA Approved

NCAA® Approved Courses

Our NCAA® Approved courses provide flexible options for young athletes with individual training and travel schedules.

Penn Foster is registered with the NCAA® Eligibility Center, enabling competitive young athletes to take advantage of online courses and fulfill eligibility requirements. These courses are part of our most academically challenging curriculum and are designed to prepare students pursuing admissions into 4-year college institutions¹.

Each course listed can be taken as full or half credit. Please note that there is four month minimum completion time for a full credit course and a two month minimum completion time for the half credit course. We recommend that you view the NCAA® website to view the latest requirements.

The Penn Foster High School CEEB code is 394413.

NCAA® Approved Courses

English

  • American Literature Advanced (1 credit)


    American Literature A

    English 3A introduces students to American Literature. It includes readings from the beginning of writing on the American continent, including Native American poems and myths to the colonialists' observations of their new world, to the nineteenth-century romanticists and realists, to the writing of the early twentieth century. In addition to this reading, students are required to complete several graded writing assignments.

    American Literature B

    English 3B covers American literature from World War II to the present. Students will examine the interactions among current events of the time, the writer's purpose, the subject, and audience expectations. In the process, students will gain an appreciation of what it is to be American and the significant impact that American culture has had on the world.
  • AP English Literature & Composition (1 credit)

    The AP English Literature & Composition course focuses on critical reading, interpretation, and writing. The course engages students in the careful reading and critical analysis of selected texts and in understanding how writers use language to provide both meaning and pleasure for their readers. As they read, students consider a work's structure, style, and themes as well as smaller-scale elements such as the use of figurative language, imagery, symbolism, and tone.
  • English Language Arts 1 Common Core (1 credit*)

    This course is aligned with the English Language Arts Common Core Standards, Grades 9-10 and includes numerous graded performance assessments that require students to apply their knowledge. Through required readings and a variety of assignments, the student will develop analytical skills that will contribute to a better understanding of a variety of literary and informational texts, including foundational American documents. While acquiring the skills of comprehending, synthesizing and evaluating information, the student will have the opportunity to gain the confidence in their capability to make sound judgments both in literature and in the real world as well as gain the ability to communicate effectively to different audiences.

    This course references Collections Grade 9, which includes a variety of complex texts, including fiction, non-fiction, and informational text. The student is also required to read the Kite Runner in Semester 1 of this course.

    *Half credit courses (semester 1 or semester 2) are also available.
  • English Language Arts 2 Common Core (1 credit*)

    This course is aligned with the English Language Arts Common Core Standards, Grades 9-10 and includes numerous graded performance assessments that require students to apply their knowledge. Through required readings and a variety of assignments, the student will develop analytical skills that will contribute to a better understanding of a variety of literary and informational texts, including foundational American documents. While acquiring the skills of comprehending, synthesizing and evaluating information, the student will have the opportunity to gain the confidence in their capability to make sound judgments both in literature and in the real world as well as gain the ability to communicate effectively to different audiences.

    This course references Collections Grade 10, which includes a variety of complex texts, including fiction, non-fiction, and informational text. The student is also required to read Kaffir Boy in Semester 1 and 1984 in Semester 2 of this course.

    *Half credit courses (semester 1 or semester 2) are also available.
  • English Language Arts 3 Common Core (1 credit*)

    This course is aligned with the English Language Arts Common Core Standards, Grades 11-12 and includes numerous graded performance assessments that require students to apply their knowledge. Through required readings and a variety of assignments, the student will develop analytical skills that will contribute to a better understanding of a variety of literary and informational texts, including foundational American documents. While acquiring the skills of comprehending, synthesizing and evaluating information, the student will have the opportunity to gain the confidence in their capability to make sound judgments both in literature and in the real world as well as gain the ability to communicate effectively to different audiences.

    This course references Collections Grade 11, which includes a variety of complex texts, including fiction, non-fiction, and informational text. The student is also required to read Adventures of Huckleberry Finn in Semester 1 and The Great Gatsby in Semester 2 of this course.

    *Half credit courses (semester 1 or semester 2) are also available.
  • English Language Arts 4 Common Core (1 credit*)

    This course is aligned with the English Language Arts Common Core Standards, Grades 11-12 and includes numerous graded performance assessments that require students to apply their knowledge. Through required readings and a variety of assignments, the student will develop analytical skills that will contribute to a better understanding of a variety of literary and informational texts, including foundational American documents. While acquiring the skills of comprehending, synthesizing and evaluating information, the student will have the opportunity to gain the confidence in their capability to make sound judgments both in literature and in the real world as well as gain the ability to communicate effectively to different audiences.

    This course references Collections Grade 12, which includes a variety of complex texts, including fiction, non-fiction, and informational text. The student is also required to read The Glass Castle in Semester 1 and To Kill a Mockingbird in Semester 2 of this course.

    *Half credit courses (semester 1 or semester 2) are also available.
  • English Literature 1 Advanced (1 credit)


    English Literature 1A

    Through required readings and exercises, English 1A introduces literary elements such as plot, setting, character, narrator, voice, theme, irony, and symbolism. In addition, the course includes a number of graded writing assignments that require students to apply their knowledge of these elements.

    English Literature 1B

    English 1B includes a number of different types of literary categories, including poetry, biographical and historical selections, an epic, a drama, and several types of workplace documents such as warranties and users' manuals. Students will improve their communication skills by applying what they learn to their own compositions.
  • English Literature 2 Advanced (1 credit)


    English Literature 2A

    English 2A presents literary elements such as plot, setting, character, and conflict and applies these elements to specific reading selections. Students are required to complete a number of graded writing assignments to help them improve their reading and writing skills.

    English Literature 2B

    English 2B explores authors' use of literary devices such as imagery and symbolism to convey meaning. Students will learn how to analyze and compare works of the same genre, and read and interpret popular media and workplace documents.
  • World Literature Advanced (1 credit)


    World Literature A

    English 4A introduces literature from around the world. The course begins back thousands of years ago and presents ideas and stories of the ancient Middle East, Greece, Rome, Africa, and Asia. Students will analyze the texts they read and also complete a number of graded writing assignments.

    World Literature B

    English 4B includes writings gathered from around the world. It covers writings from the Middle Ages in Europe to modern China. In addition to reading the assigned selections, students also learn about times and places to better appreciate the texts they study.

Languages

  • Spanish 1 Advanced (1 credit)


    Spanish 1A

    Spanish 1A introduces the fundamentals of Spanish vocabulary and grammar through reading, writing, and oral activities. It presents the basics of pronunciation and sets the groundwork for conversing in rudimentary Spanish. The course also includes an explanation of the differences in words used in Hispanic and Latino cultures, as well as the traditions, history, and geography of these cultures.

    Spanish 1B

    Spanish 1B builds on the Spanish vocabulary and grammar introduced in Spanish 1A. It introduces the vocabulary of communicating about such practical activities as ordering in a restaurant, cooking meals, keeping healthy, celebrating holidays, and taking vacations. The course also includes information on the cultures of several Spanish-speaking countries.
  • Spanish 2 Advanced (1 credit)


    Spanish 2A

    Spanish 2A continues the vocabulary and grammar instruction from Spanish 1. Students will increase their ability to express themselves in Spanish as they begin to use new words, phrases, and verb tenses. They'll also study the customs and traditions of people in different Spanish-speaking cultures.

    FL02B00 Spanish 2B

    Spanish 2B helps students improve their fluency and comprehension through practice in conversation. The emphasis is on speaking Spanish in daily life and studying the geography and history of selected Spanish-speaking countries. Students will also continue to expand their Spanish reading and writing skills.

Mathematics

  • Algebra I Advanced (1 credit)


    Algebra 1A

    Algebra 1A introduces students to the basics of algebra, including algebraic operations, equations, proportional reasoning and statistics, linear functions, inequalities, absolute values, and systems of equations.

    Algebra 1B

    Algebra 1B provides the foundation for higher math. It includes instruction on exponents and exponential functions, polynomials, factoring, quadratic functions, rational functions, coordinate geometry, probability, functions, and transformations.
  • Algebra II Advanced (1 credit)


    Algebra 2A

    Students in Algebra 2A study data and linear representations, numbers and functions, linear equations, inequalities, matrices, quadratic functions, and polynomial functions. While studying these topics, students will learn the relevance of their new knowledge to practical applications.

    Algebra 2B

    In Algebra 2B, students study exponential and logarithmic functions; rational functions and radical functions; conic sections, including parabolas, circles, ellipses, and hyperbolas; discrete mathematics, including counting principles, probability, series, patterns, and statistics.
  • AP Statistics (1 credit)

    In your AP Statistics course, you'll develop an understanding of variability through the process of analyzing data in realistic contexts. Beginning with the planning process, you'll learn methods of data collection, describing data using graphical and numerical summaries, analyzing data, and interpreting results. Through a series of Graphing Calculator Explorations and projects, you'll use graphing calculators to perform assigned tasks.
  • Geometry Advanced (1 credit)


    Geometry A

    Geometry A provides numerous hands-on activities to help students understand the deep theoretical relationships between lines, angles, polygons, circles, and three-dimensional figures. Specifically, students study length and angles; proofs and theorems; introductory logic; polygons; parallels; congruence; perimeter and area of triangles, parallelograms, and trapezoids; circumference and area of circles; the Pythagorean Theorem; solid shapes; coordinates in three dimensions; lines and planes in space; and perspective drawing.

    Geometry B

    Geometry B provides numerous hands-on activities to help students understand the deep theoretical relationships between lines, angles, polygons, circles, and three-dimensional figures. Specifically, students study area and volume of prisms, pyramids, cylinders, cones, and spheres; similarities in shapes; area and volume ratios; elements of circles (chords, arcs, tangents, inscribed angles and arcs, and secants); elements of trigonometry; graph theory; fractal geometry; and proof and logic.

Social Studies

  • American History Advanced (1 credit)


    American History A

    American History A covers the time period from the earliest natives through the late nineteenth century. It includes the discovery and settlement of the country by the Europeans; the English colonies and the war for independence; the forming of a new nation and its challenges; westward expansion, the Civil War, and reconstruction; and the immigration of people from diverse cultures and countries.

    American History B

    American History B traces the rise of the United States as a world power. It covers the period from the end of the nineteenth century to the present. Specifically, students study the age of reform, progressive politics, World War I, the Great Depression, the New Deal, World War II, the Cold War, civil rights, women's rights, the Vietnam War, and recent presidential terms (from Richard Nixon to George W. Bush).
  • AP Human Geography (1 credit)

    This college-level course in human geography combines textbook readings with active involvement by the student in applying and interpreting geographic information. Students will learn the basics of human geography-what it is and how it's used, where on Earth people live and why they inhabit those particular places, and the nature of cultures and their use of land in various settings-as well as geographical concepts, models, and technologies. In addition, the course covers trends in population growth and movement, cultural differences, and political patterns and territoriality. Agriculture, industrialization and development, and urbanism comprise additional material in the course. Students will use maps and software to apply what they've learned in the textbook. Assigned activities on real-world subjects will guide students as they solve problems increasing their understanding of human geography and helping to build their critical-thinking skills. Writing assignments will help them prepare for free-response questions and semester projects will enable students to exercise their geographical skills as they gather, analyze, interpret, and report their findings.
  • AP Microeconomics (1 credit)

    Microeconomics studies how consumers, businesses, and foreign governments interact in the marketplace to produce and sell products, how those products are priced, what resources businesses buy to produce those products, the prices that businesses pay to resources to produce those products, and how government policies (taxes, subsidies, quotas, antitrust laws, and price and non-price regulations) affect the interaction among consumers, businesses, and foreigners and the final outcome. The policy goals of microeconomics are the efficient allocation of resources and the equitable distribution of income.
  • AP World History (1 credit)

    This course, which adopts the periodization approach to analyzing global events, is designed to challenge students to develop independent ideas. It provides a foundation that emphasizes encounters and interactions among civilizations, as well as facts and analysis, providing a framework that is especially important for building perspective on the complexities of today's world. Through evaluating and interpreting documents, exploring diverse ideas, comparing cultures, and examining patterns, students will improve their analytical abilities and critical thinking skills. The course imposes a heavy reading and writing load, and the demands on students are equivalent to a full-year introductory college course.
  • Civics Advanced (1 credit)


    Civics A

    In Civics A, students will gain a sound understanding and appreciation of the documents that are the foundation of the American constitutional democracy, such as the Constitution of the United States and Declaration of Independence; the organization of the United States government at all levels; the United States political system; and the role of citizens in government.

    Civics B

    Civics B explores the role of citizens in society, the economic system of the United States, and foreign policy.
  • Economics Advanced (1 credit)


    Economics A

    Economics A covers microeconomics, which focuses on how businesses move resources around the economy to produce products for sale to households, foreign markets, governments, and other businesses; and how households, businesses, governments, and the central bank work together to achieve a successful flow of resources for the economy as a whole.

    Economics B

    Economics B focuses on macroeconomics, which explores how consumers, businesses, and foreigners interact to determine the total amount of output, employment, and income for the economy. Macroeconomics also explores the general level of prices and how government policies (tax collections and expenditures) and central bank policies (money supply and interest rates) can be used to achieve a more favorable outcome.
  • Geography Advanced (1 credit)


    Geography A

    Geography A introduces students to maps, weather, climate, landforms, bodies of water, natural resources, population and cultural geography, economic geography, and urban and rural geography. The course then relates these factors to the areas of North and South America and Europe.

    Geography B

    Geography B covers Russia, Northern Eurasia, Asia, Africa, and the lands in the Pacific. Students will explore landforms, bodies of water, climate zones, natural resources, human populations, cultural diversity, historical forces, and economic systems of these areas.
  • Psychology Advanced (1 credit)


    Psychology A

    Psychology A explores how psychologists unravel the mystery of what it is to be human, the biological processes that enable us to make sense of the world around us, how we learn and how we remember what we've learned, the nature of intelligence, and the relationship between thought and language.

    Psychology B

    Psychology B covers emotions, their components, and how they affect our lives. Specifically, the course examines motivation, human growth and development, gender roles, psychological tests, psychological disorders, therapies, and stress.
  • World History Advanced (1 credit)


    World History A

    World History A begins with the dawn of civilization and tells the stories of the ancient civilizations in Africa, Europe, and Asia. Students will explore the art, geography, politics, philosophy, and culture of the Greeks and the Romans as well as the important features of early civilizations in Africa, the Americas, and the Middle East. Next, they'll study the rise of the Byzantine Empire, the dynasties of East Asia, the kings of early Russia, and the Islamic world. Finally, they'll examine the events of the Middle Ages, ending in the Renaissance and the Age of Exploration and Expansion.

    World History B

    Students in World History B will explore the eras of absolute monarchs, the Enlightenment, the Age of Imperialism, Industrialization, the devastating wars of the 1900s, and events to the present time. They'll also study geographic features and economic and political theories that have influenced governments that have risen and fallen through the years.

Science

  • Biology Advanced (1 credit)


    Biology A

    In Biology A, students will explore the characteristics of life and the major common themes of biology, including evolution and homeostasis. They'll also investigate the ways that their actions and choices can affect both the living and nonliving components of Earth.

    Biology B

    In Biology B, students will analyze the defining characteristics of organisms belonging to different taxonomic groups and explore how evolution and natural selection produced this diversity from a common ancestor. Some of the specific topics covered are bacteria, protists, fungi, viruses, and the form and function of plants and animals.
  • Chemistry Advanced (1 credit)


    Chemistry A

    English 3A introduces students to American Literature. It includes readings from the beginning of writing on the America continent, including Native American poems and myths to the colonialists' observations of their new world, to the nineteenth-century romanticists and realists, to the writing of the early twentieth century. In addition to this reading, students are required to complete several graded writing assignments.

    Chemistry B

    Chemistry B continues the foundations of Chemistry A. Specific topics include states of matter and intermolecular forces, gases, solutions, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, reaction rates, oxidation, reduction, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, carbon and organic compounds, and biological chemistry.
  • Earth Science Advanced (1 credit)


    Earth Science A

    Earth Science A covers the structure, composition, and natural processes of Earth. It provides students with a basic knowledge of Earth, its features, its history, and its processes.

    Earth Science B

    In Earth Science B, students will learn about Earth, what's on it, what's in it, and how it works. They will test their ideas, gather data, and relate concepts. Students will analyze rocks, study earthquakes and volcanoes, examine fossils, explore the oceans, and even learn to predict weather.
  • Physical Science Advanced (1 credit)


    Physical Science A

    Physical science includes both physics and chemistry. Physical Science A focuses on chemistry. Students will study the states and structures of matter; atoms; acids, bases, and salts; nuclear changes; and motion and energy.

    Physical Science B

    Physical Science B focuses mostly on physics. Students will study heat and temperature; waves, sound, and light; electricity and magnetism; and technology. This course also introduces students to earth and space science.

¹ Remember, colleges have a variety of entry requirements, and not all colleges recognize all high school diplomas.