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Small dog in veterinary office.
There is no doubt that the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic will be long-reaching, affecting almost all industries well into the future. In order to survive and thrive post-pandemic, being able to pivot and adapt to the changes is a must. For the veterinary industry, which has seen an influx of new patients and clients due to an increase in pet ownership, a change in processes has already made a difference for practices across the country. From leveraging technology to improving communication, here’s how the pandemic has changed the way veterinary practices do business presently, which could carry forward post-pandemic.
Multi-colored cat.
As veterinary clinics continue to juggle an influx of new pet owners and increasing wellness checks from current owners, all while navigating updated covid-19 restrictions, credentialed vet techs have become more essential than ever. While the hard work of dedicated technicians has been celebrated each year during Veterinary Technician Week this year’s celebration is a special one. As essential workers, veterinary technicians have been on the front lines during the pandemic, ensuring the wellness of clients’ family pets. Rounding out a week of webinars, celebration, and awareness of what it takes to be a veterinary technician, Banfield Pet Hospital President, Brian Garish, took time to chat with Keyana Beamon, a Banfield employee and Penn Foster 2020 Graduate of the Year.
Woman in telehealth appointment.
Telemedicine isn’t a new concept in the healthcare industry, though until recently, in-person visits were the standard method of connecting with a provider. But since the start of the pandemic, telehealth has experienced a surge as patients and providers seek a socially distant option for appointments. For busy veterinary practices, offering this service in place of wellness visits can allow veterinarians and veterinary technicians to effectively see and treat more clients, potentially increasing revenue and allowing the practice to thrive throughout and after the pandemic.
veterinarian and vet tech helping patient.
Contrary to expectations, veterinary medicine has been one of the few industries to thrive - and even grow - amid the global COVID-19 pandemic. While many companies, large and small, have been forced to furlough employees or cut hiring budgets, veterinary practices have had to add new team members to handle the influx of new patients. In addition to the number of new pet owners, the veterinary industry has also seen a boom as pet parents are home more often to keep a diligent eye on the strange behaviors of their animals. With the influx of clients - from new pet owners to those who want to ensure their companion stays as healthy as possible - well trained and skilled veterinary staff is a must to ensure your practice’s success.
Veterinary team with happy dog.
First-time pet ownership can be both exciting and daunting, not only for the owner, but also for the animal. Over the past few months pet ownership has grown, including increased pet adoption, and your practice’s new clients will understandably desire quality care for their animals and compete for your attention. With this in mind, as appointments from new owners increase, what are you doing to meet both their needs and the needs of their new furry friends?
Veterinarian examining puppy.
Veterinary healthcare teams succeed when every member of the team knows their role and has the training to do it well. Each person needs to be educated to the demands of the job and then allowed to work to the top of their license. In short, each team member should become a leader in their area of expertise. Training veterinary healthcare teams helps everyone build the skills they need to help the team succeed.
Woman holding puppy.
When clients bring their pets to veterinary appointments, they expect more than a checkup. They want veterinary technicians and other team members to advise them on how to care for their pets. To consistently provide the most up-to-date recommendations, everyone on the healthcare team needs continuing education and credentialing.
Vets working on dog.
Veterinary medicine is currently a $45.9 billion dollar industry and that number is only expected to grow over the next decade. As more pet owners consider their animals to be an essential part of the family, they’re focusing on securing high quality veterinary care. In order to provide that, your veterinary practice should be aware of the challenges the industry could face, as well as commonly shared goals in the field. We surveyed 80 practice managers and practice owners to better understand the state of the industry in 2020 and what needs practices have to grow their client list, improve both employee and client retention, and more. Here’s what we learned.
Employee wearing personal protective equipment.
Today, companion animals are considered members of the family,and veterinary practices are vital to maintaining the health and happiness of the pets we love. As the world settles into the “new normal” in response to the COVID-19 crisis, essential businesses like vet clinics and hospitals are working ceaselessly to establish a balance between providing customers and clients with service and keeping employees safe. As veterinary healthcare is already a high-stress field for employees, implementing safety measures and following state and federal guidelines isn’t only beneficial for employee mental and physical health - it’s vital to ensuring your practice weathers this unprecedented global event.
Black dog baring teeth.
Most people understand that good oral hygiene and regular visits to the dentist can improve their overall health and well-being. They make getting their teeth professionally cleaned a part of their family’s healthcare routine. Yet, even people who count their pets as part of the family usually don’t think to bring their pet to a veterinary dentist unless there’s an emergency.

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