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25 Results for Category Veterinary Medicine

Vet and vet tech treating cat.
Veterinary clinics are seeing more patients, from wellness visits to emergent cases, making trained veterinary technicians more vital to a successful practice than ever especially as the number of pet owners is increasing. Pet adoptions grew 70% during the pandemic and an ASPCA survey conducted in May 2021 found that 90% of pets adopted during the last year have stayed with their owners. Handling an influx of new pet owners, plus providing excellent service to current clients, can be overwhelming for a veterinary healthcare team that has already weathered a number of changes throughout the last year and a half. Ensuring your staff is prepared to meet demand and utilize their skills to their fullest capabilities is important to maintaining efficiency and practice success. One way to do that? Provide in-depth, AVMA-accredited online training.
Woman with puppy.
Veterinary medicine typically draws a particular personality type, usually those who possess a strong sense of compassion. While this is an asset to those animals in need, showing strong emotions is not always a benefit in a professional setting. When we allow our emotions to control our responses and behaviors, we inflict our feelings upon our co-workers causing a rippling chain reaction. Equally, when we suppress our feelings, we create a cold disconnect that manifests negatively in other forms. Neither extreme is beneficial to a functioning, successful practice with employees invested for the long haul. Penn Foster’s latest webinar discussed the importance of emotional intelligence in vet practices, and life in general, with industry leaders Shawn McVey and Dr. Annika VanNoy from Pathway Vet Alliance.
dog being examined by vet.
Recently, we spoke with Dr. Marty Becker, “America’s Veterinarian” and founder of Fear Free, about the impact Fear Free certification can have on veterinary practices, veterinary technicians, and their clients. Founded in 2016, Fear Free provides online and in-person education to veterinary professionals, pet professionals, animal welfare communities, and pet owners.
veterinarian examining dog.
Traditionally, when we think about a local veterinary clinic, we’re thinking about the small, privately-owned practice run by a local veterinarian. But the concept of the veterinary hospital has changed over the last decade due to the increase in corporate-owned hospitals and clinics. It’s estimated that there were about 5,200 corporately owned clinics across the United States at the end of 2019 - and that number is only expected to grow. The growth and widespread success of corporate veterinary companies like Banfield and Mission Veterinary Partners isn’t just due to having access to a larger budget than smaller clinics; they offer a trusted standard of care that can work in a hospital in a rural town or a small clinic in a bustling city. Further, these big-name hospitals offer a variety of benefits to clients and employees that is also standardized. Private practices can take note of what corporate veterinary hospitals are doing well and implement changes at scale.
Vet tech examining patient.
A thriving veterinary practice owner or manager knows that success comes from a combination of good medicine and good business. A strong veterinary healthcare team, from veterinary assistants and credentialed veterinary technicians to veterinarians, can grow your practice – providing quality care while increasing your bottom line. Part of creating an effective team is utilizing veterinary technicians and other staff to their full potential, which includes ensuring they have the tools and knowledge to educate clients. With pet insurance becoming more prevalent, your veterinary technicians should be familiar with what it is, how it works, and how to talk about it with clients.
vet and vet tech examining dog.
As pet ownership continues to increase and current clients are seeking more wellness visits, many overwhelmed veterinary practices are struggling to accommodate appointments. This influx of new patients has put more stress on veterinary healthcare teams, contributing to an already high rate of burnout or compassion fatigue for working veterinary technicians and assistants. One way to address this issue is through increased veterinary technician utilization. Penn Foster recently hosted a roundtable discussion with industry thought leaders Liza Rudolph from East Coast Veterinary Education, Liz Hughston, President of the National Veterinary Professionals Union, and Julie Legred, co-owner of Veterinary Advancements and Vet Team Global Stream, to glean insight into proper utilization and how it can have a positive impact on productivity, client care, and the veterinary team as a whole. Here’s what we learned.
Melissa Supernor delivering keynote.
Has the importance of employee upskilling changed as a result of the pandemic? What can managers do to position their veterinary staff for growth? We spoke with Melissa J. Supernor, LVT, CVT, VTS (SAIM), a long-time learning and development strategist and instructor, to learn about why she loves her work and what practices need to consider as they think about the long-term success of their business.
Veterinary worker with dog.
2020 saw a huge jump in new pet ownership, a trend that doesn’t appear to be slowing down as we head into 2021, and veterinary practices need to figure out how to meet the rising demand in new patients. One solution is for leaders to consider how they’re maximizing the skills of their team members. More leaders are recognizing that the best way to elevate their practice is by improving the skills of their current workforce, leading to a newfound commitment to education and training for staff.
Karlene Belyea, VP of Wellness at Mission Veterinary Partners.
The pandemic, coupled with the rise in pet ownership and an increased client list, has resulted in employee burnout at many veterinary hospitals. We spoke with Karlene Belyea, VP of Wellness at Mission Veterinary Partners, to learn about her background and the inner workings of a company that strives to create a culture where employees feel appreciated, respected, and balanced.
Veterinary technicians treating a patient.
Acknowledging that the industry has largely prevailed in this turbulent period, it’s important to recognize improvements in the field and the tools that will be instrumental to any veterinary team’s success in 2021, large or small. How can practices capitalize on the current success they may be experiencing to ensure that it lasts when the future is unclear? Here are some of our predictions for the state of the veterinary industry in the upcoming year and beyond.

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