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Where Talent Meets Career Opportunity

Man using laptop computer.
Today’s dynamic workplace demands more diverse skills than ever before. Amidst the historic pandemic and shift in the economy, new jobs are being created and lesser-known roles, like contact tracing, are growing. And while a degree may prove a generalized understanding of a particular subject area, it doesn’t guarantee that the worker has the skills needed by your specific business today. This is why even though 44 percent of employers have increased the level of education required for job roles over the last five years, 62% of HR leaders are exploring or have already implemented a formal effort to deemphasize degrees and prioritize skills competencies.
Veterinary team with happy dog.
First-time pet ownership can be both exciting and daunting, not only for the owner, but also for the animal. Over the past few months pet ownership has grown, including increased pet adoption, and your practice’s new clients will understandably desire quality care for their animals and compete for your attention. With this in mind, as appointments from new owners increase, what are you doing to meet both their needs and the needs of their new furry friends?
Laptop and coffee on desk.
Until recently, most Americans valued higher education above any other preparation for the workforce. Parents advised their children to go to college so they could get a good job. Employers identified top candidates based on who had a college degree. The implication was that a college education represented the highest standard for employee training. Today, those attitudes are shifting. Both employers and employees are beginning to recognize that workers need more than academic knowledge to succeed on the job.
Veterinarian examining puppy.
Veterinary healthcare teams succeed when every member of the team knows their role and has the training to do it well. Each person needs to be educated to the demands of the job and then allowed to work to the top of their license. In short, each team member should become a leader in their area of expertise. Training veterinary healthcare teams helps everyone build the skills they need to help the team succeed.
Person petting puppy in shelter.
Having a clear social mission as a business is no longer a plus, it’s a priority. For large and small companies alike, corporate responsibility and social impact initiatives are vital to building a brand that aligns with consumer values and contributes to a greater good. But launching a social impact program needs to come from a place of authenticity and truth; empty platitudes geared toward gaining good press without action can backfire.
As we navigate a rapidly changing economy, focusing on workforce development, upskilling, and outskilling is imperative to strengthening your workforce and preparing displaced workers to play a role in a new industry. A tuition assistance program or tailored employee training program is a vital first step toward building a workforce that will support your business well into the future. While education programs and outskilling initiatives might not make your business immune to the skills gap and other pressing market challenges, they will go a long way toward making sure you always have the middle skills workforce your business needs while maintaining a positive relationship with former employees that can boost your company’s image.
Woman holding puppy.
When clients bring their pets to veterinary appointments, they expect more than a checkup. They want veterinary technicians and other team members to advise them on how to care for their pets. To consistently provide the most up-to-date recommendations, everyone on the healthcare team needs continuing education and credentialing.
Woman in manufacturing facility.
In a recent study of global talent deficit, Korn Ferry and Man Bites Dog consulting groups collaborated with Oxford Analytica to produce an economic model that would outline future labor supply and demand at impending milestones, particularly highlighting the years 2025 and 2030 in their findings. What their research uncovered is that three distinct economic markets are significantly threatened by a growing shortage of trained workers- financial and business services, media and telecommunications, and manufacturing.
Man wearing work apron.
The lines between education and employment are blurring. With the tight talent market and increasing speed of change in business, employers can no longer just hope that colleges will teach future employees relevant skills. They must take matters into their own hands. Many are building partnerships with education providers to train workforces directly and employer-assisted education is becoming a part of the standard benefits package.
Vets working on dog.
Veterinary medicine is currently a $45.9 billion dollar industry and that number is only expected to grow over the next decade. As more pet owners consider their animals to be an essential part of the family, they’re focusing on securing high quality veterinary care. In order to provide that, your veterinary practice should be aware of the challenges the industry could face, as well as commonly shared goals in the field. We surveyed 80 practice managers and practice owners to better understand the state of the industry in 2020 and what needs practices have to grow their client list, improve both employee and client retention, and more. Here’s what we learned.

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